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DNDY design specializes in making custom drapery treatments from elegant formal draperies to casual and stylish. Fully functional or just for show. 

Your fabric choices are endless and the styles many. Our services can help you source fabric or just point you in the right direction. Yet there are a few rules that do apply to most treatments. 

Here are some pointers to help you get started and make the right choices for you
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Draperies or Curtains Curtains or Draperies? 

      Draperies are fabric panels that hang from above the window to the floor, sometimes even hitting the floor in a puddle of fabric. They can just frame a window or be functional and open and close completly. Fucntional drapes can provide thermal insulation as well as light and sound control.

     Curtains hang from above the window to just below the window sill and can also be set inside a windows casing.  Cafe Curtains start midway on the window to the sill or below.  A valance is often used in tandem with cafe curtains. 

     Valances are short fabric panels that frame the top of a window and can be used with all types of widow treatments. They also are great to extend the height of a window. When it's upholstered on a form, it becomes a Cornice.
     
     Valances, Draperies and Curtains can all be lined or unlined, Sheers are made of fabric that can hold up to the sun and are intended to be transparent to translusant. They can be pleated or not, they can all utilize grommets or tabs. 
     Lining provides a fullness to your fabric, helps it hang nicely and most important protects your investment from the sun.  As a benefit it can also provide sound, light and thermal insulation depending on the lining choice. DNDY design provides the best in all levels of lining products. 
      Draperies and curtains are constructed in panel widths of fabric (most fabrics are 54" wide) to achieve the desired fullness for you design and are pleated down to finish width.
     Pleats??? Why Pleats? Drapery pleats are there so when you close your drape its fullness will follow and be dispersed evenly. With a flat panel drape with no pleats the fullness must be evened out manually each time you close the drapes. Pleats come in many styles. To name a few: The Box pleat this pleat can be reversed or set forward, The Pinch pleat, The Goblet pleat or Cartridge Pleat. Each pleat emulates a different style...my favorite is a Reverse Box pleat. Yet there are still so many ways to finish the tops of your drapery not to mention your hems. The DNDY workroom always puts double 4" fold hems on all drapery as deep hems make them hang nicer. The formula to the right will show you how to calculate your yardage needs. 

If you have any questions about any drapery style or want to know what would work best for you, please ask. We believe by understanding what you want and being informed, you make better choices.

Call DNDY design today.


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Click on the picture to see photos of past projects

Drapery Hardware is often overlooked when you start out. However it is one of the most important aspects of your instalation. How long your drapes are and how well they function opening and closing is completely dependent on the hardware. DNDY can assist in your search. We keep accounts with many of the nations largets hardware manufacturers including Kirsch and Orion. If custom is what is required we also work with metal artists to bring your dreams to reality. Call today for a appointment to look at the wholesellers show room or for me to bring catalogs to you.


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Reverse Box Pleat

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Pinch Pleat

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Goblet Pleat

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Cartridge Pleat

How Much Fabric Do I Need????

     Figuring how much yardage you need, first requires you to know how wide your drape will hang, how long, and how full you want them. How wide, is generally the width of your drapery rod. Most drapes extend beyond the width of the window allowing your stack space not to block your outside views and light. You also need to account for pattern repeats and hemming allowance, (our work room requests 18” hem allowance per panel). Once you know how wide and how long and how full just fill in the blanks to determine our yardage. For our example our Rod is 84” we want double fullness and a finish length of 90”.

Step 1.  Collect all your information

Rod length.........84

Fabric fullness......2 

Finish length.......86

Hem allowance....18

Width of fabric.....54

Pattern repeat.....27

Step 2. Calculate the number of panels needed

Rod Length..................84

Multiply by fullness.......x 2

Total Width ............... 168

Divide by fabric width… /54

Result..................... 3.11

Round up to nearest whole number. It is ok to round down if under .25 in some cases with light fabrics I will round up to nearest whole even number. For our example we will round down to 3 panel cuts of fabric.

Step 3. Calculate rough cut panel lengths.

Finish length..........86

Hem allowance.......18

Equals cut length...104


This is the length each cut of fabric needs to be if you have no pattern repeat head to the next step. If you have a repeat, keep going.


Cut Length................... 104

Divide by repeat........... / 27

Result..........................3.85

Round up......................... 4

Multiply by repeat............ 27

Result is length of each panel.. 108


Step 4.  Calculating the yardage.

Enter cuts from step 2 ...................3

Enter length from step 3.............108

Multiply cuts by length................324

Divide by .................................. 36


Total yards needed ..................... 9

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